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   Occupational Safety – Part 2 Credits: 2  $16.00
There are a number of potential occupational health hazards associated with working in the dental office and dental personnel must implement preventive measures to reduce personal health risks linked to these hazards. Occupational hazards addressed in this course include bonding materials and acrylics, etching materials, hazardous noise levels and occupational hand injuries. This course discusses strategies to reduce potential occupational hazards, risk associated with noise levels, implantation of standard precautions to help reduce the risk of occupational associated infections, types of occupational musculoskeletal problems and to reduce or prevent occupational musculoskeletal injuries. Authors: Ellen Diets, CDA Emeritus, AAS, BS; Adrianne E. Avillion, D.Ed., RN, Original Release date: 11-4-2009; Reviewed 8-1-2016; Expiration date: 8-1-2019.
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   A Review of Surgical Asepsis and Preparation before Performing the Surgical Dental Procedures Credits: 2  $16.00
Surgical asepsis is the procedure done to reduce or eliminate contaminants; such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites, from entering the operative field to prevent infection. This contamination of the field of operation may occur from outside or from within the body. Surgical team must practice standard precautions to prevent any risk of contamination. If the precautions are not followed then the infection may be introduced on hands, instruments or ligatures, or by droplet infections. The goal to perform asepsis protocol is to eliminate infection and not sterility. Sterility is the “complete removal of contaminants.” Upon completion of this course, the participant will: 1) Understand the definition of asepsis. 2) Understand the aseptic procedures followed in an oral surgery office. 3) Understand the risks for not following the proper aseptic procedures. Author's Bio: Aamna Nayyar holds a B.S. in biological sciences from the University of Karachi, Pakistan, and Doctorate degree in dentistry from Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro, Pakistan. She received a silver medal for top honors in the final year of her dental degree. Aamna completed two years of post-graduate residency in general dentistry at Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. She is has her dental practice license in good standing with Dental Board of California and Pakistan Medical & Dental Council. She is also a member of the American Dental Association (ADA), American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and Skill-USA. Ms. Nayyar reports no conflicts of interest associated with this work. Email: aamna.nayyar@gmail.com Original Release Date: July 1, 2012; Review date: February 1, 2016 Expiration Date: February 1, 2019
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   Autoimmune Diseases - A brief review with practical applications for the dental professional Credits: 2  $16.00
This course reviews the four main autoimmune diseases likely to be encountered in a typical dental practice. At the completion of this course, the dental professional will be able to: 1. Understand the concept of immunologic tolerance. 2. Understand the pathophysiology of the four main autoimmune diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome and scleroderma. 3. Be able to recognize the clinical signs and symptoms of the main autoimmune diseases in order to refer patients for consultation if necessary. 4. Be aware of the effects these autoimmune diseases may have on dental management, and be able to adjust patient care accordingly. Author’s Bio: Kristine Krafts, MD received her Doctor of Medicine from University of Minnesota School of Medicine. She is a medical doctor with 15 years experience as adjunct and assistant professor of pathology. Seasoned lecturer and prolific medical writer. Completed residency in pathology, and fellowships in hematopathology and molecular medicine. Currently teaching pathology, immunology, and microbiology at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Duluth Campus, and pathology for dental students at the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry. Dr. Krafts reports no conflicts of interest associated with this work. Email: kristinekrafts@gmail.com Original release date May 1, 2013; Review date: August 1, 2016; Expiration date August 1, 2019
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   Nitrous Oxide in the Dental Office Credits: 2  $16.00
This course describes how nitrous oxide is administered, adverse affects, personal hygiene procedure to protect DHCWs, potential dangers with recreational use/abuse, methods and guidelines to reduce risk and recommendations for monitoring and measurement of airborne N2O/O2. At the completion of this course the dental professional will be able to: 1. Describe how and why nitrous oxide/oxygen sedation (N2O/O2) is administered in the dental office. 2. Describe documentation procedures. 3. Understand indications and contraindications for the use of nitrous oxide in the dental office. 4. Describe signs to watch for when monitoring and emergency procedures to use when a patient has an adverse effect from nitrous oxide. 5. Understand specific information for titration of nitrous oxide and the amount and time needed for the administration of oxygen after. 6. List and discuss NIOSH* recommendations for monitoring and measurement of airborne N2O/O2. 7. Describe personal hygiene procedure to protect dental healthcare workers (DHCWs) and recommendations for storage of N2O/O2. 8. Relate guidelines for handling accidental spills of N2O/O2. 9. Describe biological effects and dangers associated with recreational use/abuse and high doses of N2O/O2 sedation gases. Author’s Bio: Candice M. Groat, RDH, MS Biology. Ms. Groat received her B.S. in Dental Hygiene, Magna Cum Laude from University of Southern California. She received her M.S. in Biology from California State University. Ms. Groat is currently Director of Dental Hygiene at Geoffrey A. Groat, D.D.S. in San Pedro, CA. Ms. Groat reports no conflicts of interest associated with this work. Original release date July 1, 2013; Review date: September 1, 2016 Expiration date September 1, 2019.
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   The Role of the Dental Healthcare Provider in Oral Habit Prevention and Treatment Credits: 2  $16.00
This course discusses theories of the causes or oral habits, potential dentofacial changes, orthopedic problems associated with these habits, specific rationale for intervention and successful treatment options. At the completion of this accredited home-study course, members of the dental team will be able to: Discuss theories of the causes of oral habits and how these behaviors may be used as self soothing, adaptive response in threatening situations. Describe potential dentofacial changes and orthopedic problems associated with thumb and finger sucking, nail and lip biting and sucking and tongue thrusting. Relate specific rationale for intervention in the behaviors. Describe considerations in using the pacifier as a substitute for thumb sucking and how to educate parents about what to look for in a pacifier. Describe various other successful treatment options to alleviate thumb sucking and other related oral habits in young children and adults. Author’s Bio: Candice M. Groat, RDH, MS Biology. Ms. Groat received her B.S. in Dental Hygiene, Magna Cum Laude from University of Southern California. She received her M.S. in Biology from California State University. Ms. Groat is currently Director of Dental Hygiene at Geoffrey A. Groat, D.D.S. in San Pedro, CA. Ms. Groat reports no conflicts of interest associated with this work. Original release date September 1, 2014; Expiration date September 1, 2017
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   Radiology in Dentistry Credits: 2  $16.00
This course describes how X-rays work, how often dental radiographs should be taken, the four types of radiation and their relevance to dentistry and the need for quality assurance. Also discussed is the significance of occupational exposure, proper handling and disposal, OSHA required MSDSs and responsibilities of members of the dental team. At the completion of this course the dental team member will be able to: 1. List and describe how X-rays work. 2. List and describe how often dental radiographs should be taken. 3. List and describe the four types of radiation and their relevance to dentistry. 4. Relate the significance of occupational exposure as it applies to radiographic surveys in the dental office. 5. Be familiar with proper handling and disposal of dental film and processing chemistry byproducts. 6. Be familiar with the contents of OSHA-required Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs)/Safety Data Sheets (SDSs). 7. List the responsibilities of members of the dental team during radiographic exposure. 8. Describe the need for quality assurance during radiographic exposures. Author's Bio: Lori Solomon, RDH, BS. Ms. Solomon received her B.S. in Dental Hygiene, from University of Michigan. Ms. Solomon divides her professional interests among teaching preventive dentistry at UCLA, School of Dentistry, working clinically in a private Pedodontic Practice and as a Public Health Hygienist at a dental center for low income children. Original release date March 1, 2015; Expiration date March 1, 2018
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   Occupational Safety – Part I (Updated) Credits: 1  $8.00
This course discusses the many potential occupational health hazards associated with working in the dental office. At the completion of this course, members of the dental team will be able to: • Describe potential occupational hazards associated with employment in the dental office. • Identify common health risks associated with working with glutaraldehydes, nitrous oxide, oxygen and biosaerosols. • Describe protective guidelines for working with glutaraldehydes, nitrous oxide, oxygen, and biosaerosols. • Identify interventions to reduce the potential for occupational hazards associated with employment in the dental office Authors: Ellen Diets, CDA Emeritus, AAS, BS; Adrianne E. Avillion, D.Ed., RN, Original Release date: 11-4-2009; Reviewed 7-1-2015; Expiration date: 7-1-2018.
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   Introduction to Salivary Diagnostics Credits: 2  $16.00
This course discusses research goals, important benefits, basic components and the chemistry of saliva, emerging technologies, methods for collection and human biomarkers. At the completion of the is course, members of the dental team will be able to: 1. Understand the research goals of the National Institute of Dental and Cranialfacial Research and the changing roles of the Cambridge Health Alliance trained oral phy¬sicians in the transformation of healthcare delivery. 2. Describe some of the many impor¬tant benefits obtained by early diag¬nosis of diseases and how salivary diagnostics can contribute to early identification of certain diseases. 3. Describe the basics of the compo¬nents of saliva as they compare to blood plasma and the formation of saliva in the salivary ducts. 4. Describe some of the basics of the chemistry of saliva and the location of the various salivary glands. 5. Describe some of the emerging technologies which are being incor¬porated into clinical practice for the purpose of salivary diagnostics. 6. Describe the methods for collection of saliva and how they differ. 7. Understand the definition of a human biomarker and some types of biomarkers which may indicate early disease states. Author’s Bio: Candice M. Groat, RDH, MS Biology. Ms. Groat received her B.S. in Dental Hygiene, Magna Cum Laude from University of Southern California. She received her M.S. in Biology from California State University. Ms. Groat is currently Director of Dental Hygiene at Geoffrey A. Groat, D.D.S. in San Pedro, CA. Ms. Groat reports no conflicts of interest associated with this work. Original release date September 1, 2015; Expiration date September 1, 2018
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   Dental Care for the Patient with Multiple Sclerosis Credits: 2  $16.00
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive neu¬rological disease caused by degenerating myelin, the substance that covers nerve fi¬bers. In order to render routine dental care, the DHCW may need to accommodate for symptoms such as impaired muscle con¬trol and coordination, fatigue, and pain. Patients are at risk for oral health compli¬cations and orofacial morbidities, particu¬larly, trigeminal neuralgia, which causes episodes of intense pain. Medications routinely used in dental care may interact with those given to slow the progression of the disease. This course describes disease symptoms and how they may affect dental care and oral health; explains the various orofacial co-morbidities that may affect patients and how the DHCW can intervene in order to make the patient comfortable and render care; identifies various medications taken to slow progression of the disease and how to reduce the risk of drug complications and how to develop a plan of care for the patient to educate him/herself in oral self-management. Authors: Susan Peterman, MA, MPH; Adrianne E. Avillion, D.Ed., RN, Original Release date: 5-2-2010; reviewed 10-1-2016; Expiration date: 10-1-2019.
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   Alternative Dental Practices Credits: 2  $16.00
This course discusses alternative dental practices which recognize that dental care has an effect on the whole body, unlike traditional dentistry which mainly focus on the obvious signs and symptoms. These practices identify and eliminate the root cause of the problem by including practices that help boost the body’s defense mechanism, helping to relax the body and reducing manmade chemicals which are known hazards to the human body, so that the patient may reach optimal health and wellbeing. Alternative dental practices include unconventional diagnostic and treatment approaches to oral healthcare. Upon completion of this course, the participant will: 1) Understand the definition of Holistic Dentistry; 2) Be introduced to common alternative dental practices; 3) Understand the pros and cons of commonly used alternative dental practices. Author’s Bio: Aamna Nayyar holds a B.S. in biological sciences from the University of Karachi, Pakistan, and Doctorate degree in dentistry from Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro, Pakistan. She received a silver medal for top honors in the final year of her dental degree. Aamna completed two years of post-graduate residency in general dentistry at Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. She has her dental practice license in good standing with Dental Board of California and Pakistan Medical & Dental Council. She is also a member of the American Dental Association (ADA), American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and Skill-USA. Original release date: Nov 1, 2012 Review date: 7-1-16 Expiration date: 7-1-19
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   Treating Patients with Special Health Care Needs and Disabilities Credits: 2  $16.00
The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) defines special health care needs (SHCN) as “any physical, developmental, mental, sensory, behavioral, cognitive, or emotional impairment or limiting condition that requires medical management, health care intervention, and/or use of specialized services or programs. At the completion of this course, the dental professional will be able to: 1. Define special health care needs (SHCN). 2. Recognize the barriers to care for patients with SHCN. 3. Describe the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and relate how it impacts the dental office. 4. List the number of patients having disabilities in the U.S., according to the US Census. 5. Evaluate recommendations in treating patients with special health care needs. 6. Describe how to prepare your office for treating patients with special health care needs. 7. Know the anatomical differences in patients with Down syndrome. 8. Determine the importance of obtaining a thorough medical history for patients with special health care needs. 9. Know the common conditions that involve alteration of routine dental care. Author’s Bio: Dr. Malinda Husson is a graduate of Marshall University in Huntington, WV and received her dental degree from West Virginia University School of Dentistry. Following graduation Dr. Husson completed a General Practice Residency at the VAMC and Washington Hospital Center in Washington, DC. Dr. Husson practiced general dentistry in a group practice for one year, prior to moving to New York City to complete a residency in dental anesthesiology from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. After practicing general dentistry and Dental Anesthesia for the special needs population, she completed a residency in Pediatric Dentistry. In 2011 she graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry with a Masters of Science in Dentistry. She is a board certified Dentist Anesthesiologist and Pediatric Dentist and enjoys treating children and patients with special healthcare needs of all ages. Dr. Malinda Husson reports no conflict of interest associated with this work. Email: hussonmm@vcu.edu Original release date: March 1, 2013 Reviewed: January 1, 2017; Expiration date: January 1, 2020
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California Dental Practice Act Credits: 2  $16.00
This mandatory two unit course is required by the Dental Board of California for all dental licensees seeking a renewal of their license. This course will cover the following topics: scope of practice, license renewal requirements, legal duties of dental auxiliaries, prescription drug regulations, violations and regulations of the California Practice Act. Author's Bio: Diane Callahan, RDH, BS is a 1986 graduate of Marquette University, School of Dental Hygiene. She is a former clinical professor at the University of Minnesota and is currently a dental hygiene instructor at Madison Area Technical College (MATC), Madison, WI, where she has been on the faculty since 2000. Reviewed and updated by Lori Solomon, RDH, BS. Ms. Solomon received her B.S. in Dental Hygiene, from University of Michigan. Ms. Solomon divides her professional interests among teaching preventive dentistry at UCLA, School of Dentistry, working clinically in a private Pedodontic Practice and as a Public Health Hygienist at a dental center for low income children. Ms. Solomon reports no conflicts of interest associated with this work. Original Release date of September 1, 2010; Review date September 1, 2014, Expiration Date September 1, 2017
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Anemia - A brief review with practical applications for the dental professional Credits: 2  $16.00
This course reviews basic facts of red cell structure and development, summarizes salient laboratory tests, and presents the pathophysiology and clinical findings of several types of anemia. Implications for dental management are discussed. At the completion of this course, members of the dental team will: 1. Understand the structure of the red cell, the composition of hemoglobin, and the process by which the red cell develops. 2. Be familiar with the common laboratory tests used to diagnose anemia. 3. Understand the pathophysiology of several of the more common types of anemia. 4. Be able to recognize the clinical signs and symptoms of anemia in order to refer patients for consultation if necessary. 5. Be aware of the effect anemia may have on dental management, and be able to adjust patient care accordingly. Author’s Bio: Kristine Krafts, MD received her Doctor of Medicine from University of Minnesota School of Medicine. She is a medical doctor with 15 years experience as adjunct and assistant professor of pathology. Seasoned lecturer and prolific medical writer. Completed residency in pathology, and fellowships in hematopathology and molecular medicine. Currently teaching pathology, immunology, and microbiology at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Duluth Campus, and pathology for dental students at the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry. Kristine Krafts reports no conflicts of interest associated with this work. Email: kristinekrafts@gmail.com Original release date August 30, 2010; Review date May 13, 2014; Course Expiration date December 31, 2017
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Thyroid Disorders in the Dental Patient Credits: 3  $24.00
This course covers the anatomy and physiology of the thyroid gland and its hormones, common signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, clinical and laboratory methods for evaluating patients, the epidemiology, clinical presentation and pathologic findings of the major types of thyroid disease and how to provide safe, effective dental care to patients with thyroid disease. Upon completion of this course, the participant will: 1. Understand the anatomy and physiology of the thyroid gland and its hormones. 2. Recognize the common signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. 3. Be familiar with the clinical and laboratory methods for evaluating a patient with suspected thyroid disease. 4. Know about the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and pathologic findings of the major types of thyroid diseases. 5. Understand how to provide safe, effective dental care to patients with thyroid disease. Author’s Bio: Kristine Krafts, MD received her Doctor of Medicine from University of Minnesota School of Medicine. She is a medical doctor with 15 years experience as adjunct and assistant professor of pathology. Seasoned lecturer and prolific medical writer. Completed residency in pathology, and fellowships in hematopathology and molecular medicine. Currently teaching pathology, immunology, and microbiology at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Duluth Campus, and pathology for dental students at the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry. Kristine Krafts reports no conflicts of interest associated with this work. Email: kristinekrafts@gmail.com Original release date May 1, 2009; Review Date June 9, 2014 Expiration date December 1, 2017
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Hemostasis: General Principles and Disorders Credits: 2  $16.00
This course discusses the general process by which blood clots, mechanisms that oppose blood clotting, evaluating a patient with a suspected bleeding or thrombotic disorder, clinical signs and symptoms, treatments available for uncontrolled post-operative bleeding. At the completion of this course, members of the dental team will be able to: 1. Understand the general process by which blood clots and the mechanisms that oppose blood clotting; 2. Be familiar with the clinical and laboratory methods for evaluating a patient with a suspected bleeding or thrombotic disorder; 3. Recognize the clinical signs and symptoms of the major bleeding and thrombotic disorders; 4. Be able to screen patients for potential bleeding problems, and be aware of the major topical hemostatic treatments available for uncrontrolled post-operative bleeding. Author’s Bio: Kristine Krafts, MD received her Doctor of Medicine from University of Minnesota School of Medicine. She is a medical doctor with 15 years experience as adjunct and assistant professor of pathology. Seasoned lecturer and prolific medical writer. Completed residency in pathology, and fellowships in hematopathology and molecular medicine. Currently teaching pathology, immunology, and microbiology at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Duluth Campus, and pathology for dental students at the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry. Author’s Bio: Kristine Krafts, MD received her Doctor of Medicine from University of Minnesota School of Medicine. She is a medical doctor with 15 years experience as adjunct and assistant professor of pathology. Seasoned lecturer and prolific medical writer. Completed residency in pathology, and fellowships in hematopathology and molecular medicine. Currently teaching pathology, immunology, and microbiology at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Duluth Campus, and pathology for dental students at the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry. Kristine Krafts reports no conflicts of interest associated with this work. Email: kristinekrafts@gmail.com Original release date January 5, 2010; Review date June 9, 2014; Course Expiration date December 31, 2017
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Leukemia - signs, symptoms and implications for dental management Credits: 2  $16.00
This course discusses the development, spreading, major types of, signs and symptoms of leukemia. Unique effects of leukemia on dental management and how to adjust patient care accordingly are also discussed. At the completion of this course, members of the dental team will: 1. Understand how leukemia develops and spreads. 2. Be able to distinguish between the major types of leukemia. 3. Be familiar with the main methods of diagnosing leukemia. 4. Recognize the clinical signs and symptoms of leukemia in order to refer patients for consultation if necessary. 5. Be aware of the unique effects leukemia may have on dental management, and be able to adjust patient care accordingly. Author’s Bio: Kristine Krafts, MD received her Doctor of Medicine from University of Minnesota School of Medicine. She is a medical doctor with 15 years experience as adjunct and assistant professor of pathology. Seasoned lecturer and prolific medical writer. Completed residency in pathology, and fellowships in hematopathology and molecular medicine. Currently teaching pathology, immunology, and microbiology at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Duluth Campus, and pathology for dental students at the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry. Author’s Bio: Kristine Krafts, MD received her Doctor of Medicine from University of Minnesota School of Medicine. She is a medical doctor with 15 years experience as adjunct and assistant professor of pathology. Seasoned lecturer and prolific medical writer. Completed residency in pathology, and fellowships in hematopathology and molecular medicine. Currently teaching pathology, immunology, and microbiology at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Duluth Campus, and pathology for dental students at the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry. Kristine Krafts reports no conflicts of interest associated with this work. Email: kristinekrafts@gmail.com Original release date January 1, 2011; Review date January 13, 2014; Course Expiration date December 31, 2017
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Lymphoma – Signs, symptoms and implications for dental management Credits: 2  $16.00
This course discusses more common types of lymphoma, methods of diagnosing, clinical signs and symptoms, unique symptoms and general methods of treating these symptoms. At the completion of this course, members of the dental team will: 1. Understand the distinguishing features of the more common types of lymphoma. 2. Be familiar with the methods of diagnosing lymphoma. 3. Recognize the clinical signs and symptoms of lymphoma in order to refer patients for consultation if necessary. 4. Be aware of the unique symptoms that may arise in a patient being treated for lymphoma, and know the general methods of treating these symptoms. Author’s Bio: Kristine Krafts, MD received her Doctor of Medicine from University of Minnesota School of Medicine. She is a medical doctor with 15 years experience as adjunct and assistant professor of pathology. Seasoned lecturer and prolific medical writer. Completed residency in pathology, and fellowships in hematopathology and molecular medicine. Currently teaching pathology, immunology, and microbiology at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Duluth Campus, and pathology for dental students at the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry. Kristine Krafts reports no conflicts of interest associated with this work. Email: kristinekrafts@gmail.com. Original Release date: May 4, 2011; Review date May 13, 2014; Expiration date December 31, 2017
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Growth Factors and Periodontal Regeneration Credits: 8  $64.00
THIS COURSE WAS WRITTEN FOR DENTISTS - Growth factors are essential biological mediators that occur naturally. They facilitate cell growth, differentiation, survival, and function in specific cell populations. Without growth factors life as we know it would not exist. At the completion of this course students will be able to: 1. Define the difference between repair and regeneration. 2. Discuss the potential for periodontal tissues to undergo repair versus regeneration. 3. Discuss the concepts of oral wound healing in periodontics. 4. Understand the role of growth and differentiation factors in periodontal regeneration. 5. Discuss the principles of the biology of wound healing. 6. Understand the molecular and cell biology of cementum. 7. Discuss the role of cementum in periodontal wound healing and regeneration. 8. Understand the role of growth factors as indicators of periodontal disease activity. 9. Discuss the methods available to deliver growth factors to sites of periodontal disease. 10. Discuss the future use of gene therapy to target growth factors to periodontal tissues. 11. Discuss how human derived dental stem cells might have potential use in the future. 12. Discuss the use of stem cells in periodontal regeneration. 13. Discuss the impact of growth factors and cytokines on the differentiation of osteoblasts. 14. Discuss the regulation and interaction of growth factor pathways. Author’s Bio: Sue Hauwiller, DMD, MS Diplomate, American Board of Periodontology. Dr. Hauwiller is a Periodontist and a Diplomate of the American Board of Periodontology. She is a Dental Continuing Education Consultant and Course Developer. She is a retired US Naval officer and has taught Periodontics at Loyola University and General Dentistry in the Department of Oral Diagnosis at the University of Illinois, both in the Chicago, Illinois area. Her educational background is well grounded in science and health care. She began her career as a Registered Nurse trained at Barnes Hospital School of Nursing, which is associated with Washington University Medical School in St. Louis, Missouri. She continued her education at Southern Illinois University where she received a Bachelor of Science with a major in biology and a minor in chemistry. Dr. Hauwiller then completed her Doctorate in Dental Medicine from Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine. In addition, she received a Certificate in Advanced Periodontology in conjunction with a Master of Science, with clinical research and a thesis on “Periodontal Disease in a Sample of the Healthy Aged” from Northwestern University in Chicago, Illinois. Dr. Hauwiller received her Board Certification as a Diplomate from the American Board of Periodontology. Dr. Hauwiller reports no conflict of interest associated with this work. Original release date: 2007 Review date: 3/3/15 Expiration Date: 3/3/18
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Infection Prevention: What it means - Rolling the dice with patients health Credits: 2  $16.00
This course discusses the modes of disease transmission, the importance of integration of health profile data, difference between sterilization and disinfection, emerging and re-emerging diseases, the new bugs on the block and reviews enhanced basic steps in sterilization techniques. At the completion of this course students will 1. Understand modes of disease transmission. 2. Describe emerging & re-emerging diseases. 3. Learn importance of integration of health profile data. 4. Identify the new bugs on the block. 5. Review enhanced basic steps in sterilization techniques. 6. Define difference between sterilization and disinfection. 7. Be aware of the California Standards on Infection Control. Author: Patricia M. Pine, RDH, has more than 30 years of experience and is currently practicing as a clinical hygienist in Scottsdale, Arizona with a comprehensive practice that has connected the medical and dental sides of the human body with the latest scientific literature. Pat is founder of Unique Dental Organizational Services. She provides practices with safety exercises that keep teams up-to-date and safe in all aspects of infection control including OSHA guidelines. Ms. Pine reports no conflicts of interest associated with this work. Email uniquedental123@cox.net. Original Release date: 8/1/2011; Reviewed 11-1-14; Expiration date:11-1-2017. This course satisfies the California Dental Board requirement for 2 units of "infection control" continuing education for biennial relicensure.
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Common Radiographic Pitfalls and How to Prevent Them Update Credits: 1  $8.00
This course reviews the vital role the dental team has in effectively and safely taking radiographs. At the completion of this accredited home-study course, members of the dental team will be able to: 1. Describe the vital role of the dental team member in educating and assuring the patient about the importance of dental radiographs and how this helps the procedure go more smoothly. 2. List and describe conditions found on radiographs that assist the dentist in making a comprehensive 3. diagnosis of dental conditions and diseases. 4. Identify common radiographic exposure pitfalls and how to avoid or correct them. 5. List effective office maintenance to help care for x-ray film automatic processors. 6. Describe digital radiography and how it differs from film radiography. 7. Describe why quality assurance is important in dental radiographic procedures. Authors Bio: Ellen Dietz, CDA Emeritus, AAS, BS, earned her BS in Allied Health Education in Dental Auxiliary. Lori Solomon, RDH, BS. Ms. Solomon received her B.S. in Dental Hygiene, from University of Michigan. Ms. Solomon divides her professional interests among teaching preventive dentistry at UCLA, School of Dentistry, working clinically in a private Pedodontic Practice and as a Public Health Hygienist at a dental center for low income children. Ms. Solomon reports no conflicts of interest associated with this work. Original Release date of January 1, 2003; Review date April 1, 2014, Expiration Date December 31, 2017.
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Trends in Orthodontia Credits: 2  $16.00
This course discusses orthodontics as a specialty within dentistry and the advances in orthodontic technology. At the completion of this accredited home-study course, members of the dental team will be able to: 1. Define and describe normal occlusion and understand some of the basics of orthodontia. 2. List and discuss emerging trends, appliances and technology in orthodontic treatment. 3. List and discuss successful preventive products and strategies for use during orthodontic treatment. Author’s Bio: Candice M. Groat, RDH, MS Biology. Ms. Groat received her B.S. in Dental Hygiene, Magna Cum Laude from University of Southern California. She received her M.S. in Biology from California State University. Ms. Groat is currently Director of Dental Hygiene at Geoffrey A. Groat, D.D.S. in San Pedro, CA. Ms. Groat reports no conflicts of interest associated with this work. Email: groat99@aol.com Original release date June 1, 2014; Expiration date June 1, 2017
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Substance Abuse: Awareness, Effects, Obligations and Treatment Credits: 3  $24.00
This course describes the signs and characteristics consistent with substance abuse. Causes, manifestations of, obligations of dentist and staff, symptoms and management of, signs specifically associated with dental personnel and recommended strategies to detect and refer patients are all discussed. At the completion of this course students will: 1. Recognize the difference between social user, substance abuser and addict; 2. Explain the 4 stages of substance abuse; 3.Define terminology related to substance abuse.4.List obligations of the dentist regarding substance abuse. 5. List sources of tobacco. 6. Describe signs and characteristics consistent with substance abuse. 7. List causes and manifestations of oral-dental disease related to substance abuse. 8. Discuss the signs, symptoms and management of “meth mouth.” 9. List appropriate recommended management strategies to detect and refer patients with suspected substance abuse. 10. Recognize the signs and symptoms specifically associated with substance abuse in dental personnel and ways to address it. 11. Identify commonly abused prescription drugs and illegal drugs. Author's Bio: Lori Solomon, RDH, BS. Ms. Solomon received her B.S. in Dental Hygiene, from University of Michigan. Ms. Solomon divides her professional interests among teaching preventive dentistry at UCLA, School of Dentistry, working clinically in a private Pedodontic Practice and as a Public Health Hygienist at a dental center for low income children. Original Release date of December 1, 2014; Expiration Date December 1, 2017.
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